Reviews

The following are just a few of the many comments I have received about my books. If you would like to make comments about my books then feel free to do so. I enjoy hearing from those who read my work. There are reviews for all of my books, some of which have been emailed to me but others are taken from Amazon and other third party websites.

Reviews of Unsolved Murders in South Yorkshire
The York Press (a daily newspaper from York):
'... The author has taken 10 real-life cold cases of the 19th and 20th centuries and examined all the facts carefully leaving us to make our own conclusions. ... The text is written in an interesting manner that weighs up the possibilities of solution, while the author has provided many of the photographs himself. ...'

*****

By Charles Lawson
I enjoyed this book, it has old and more recent cases. The reports are detailed enough for interest but are not too long whereby they become dull. As I enjoy true crime and live in Yorkshire I knew a bit about most of the cases but not all of them. I can recommend this book.

*****

By P. Butterworth
I gave this to a friend as a gift and he is thoroughly enjoying it. He likes factual books, especially anything local to where he lives.

*****

Reviews of Deadly Derbyshire

‘Completely fascinating’
A review in the Chesterfield Waterstone’s store (written by staff members): ‘Completely fascinating with well-researched information from nationally acclaimed author Scott.’

Reviews of Unsolved Murders in and Around Derbyshire

‘solid original research. … Well worth reading’, ‘Very worthwhile’, 'Thought-provoking and very readable'

By C. K. Harrison
I was attracted to this work by a report of the fiftieth anniversary of what came to be known as the "Pretty Windows" murder, a baffling murder mystery which is still unsolved. I am intrigued by unsolved cases, so I was very pleased to see it had been featured in this book, which contains accounts of a number of cases where the culprit was never caught. The most famous case is probably that of Wendy Sewell, as the events surrounding her supposed killer (who was later released from prison) made the national headlines a few years back. The matter is handled very well by the writer, but it is worth saying that all the cases featured are extremely thought-provoking. There are times the author mentions a suspect who seems on the surface to be the guilty party, but then reveals that the person involved was questioned and cleared by police, leaving the case virtually back at square one.
There has obviously been a considerable amount of research carried out for each case, which is always very gratifying when dealing with true crime. This means that we not only have a full picture of what took place, but we can also have a great deal of trust in the accounts provided.
It's interesting to note, too, just how eerie the murder scenes were in some of the cases featured. Many of them took place in deserted areas and you realise that, going back only a few decades, many areas of the country were yet to experience the urban planning we have now and really were cut off from the rest of the world. This no doubt explains why they remain unsolved: it was not simply a question of forensics being less developed then, but the geographical factor often helped the murderer to escape. This is a very worthwhile contribution to true crime works, and I would strongly recommend it to anyone interested in the subject.

*****

Interesting read
By Chez
I don't usually like reading unsolved murders because I don't like mysteries, but this book is so full of facts that in some of the cases you almost think you know "who done it", and made me wonder if Scott Lomax came to the same conclusions.

*****

An insight into local history - the bits you don't get told! By Anners I read this book from cover to cover the first time I picked it up. I was fascinated to read that some of these tragic snippets of history happened in my local town over 100 years ago. Thoroughly interesting and well executed!

A review on Amazon: ‘it is based on solid original research and well worth reading. Lomax, who surely must be a Derbyshire local, has dug deep in the original sources, and used his good judgment to make what seems to be logical and independent deductions. The later chapters, on the Wendy Sewell, Barbara Mayo and Judith Roberts cases, were all thought-provoking. Derbyshire must have had some pretty clever murderers in those days, and some fairly mediocre detectives, who specialized in 'getting the village idiot to confess’

*****

Reviews of Jeremy Bamber: Evil, Almost Beyond Belief?
‘fantastic reading’, ‘wonderful’

For a review by leading campaigning journalist Bob Woffinden, of my Jeremy Bamber book, please click here

Mrs F. O - I have finished your book and it is wonderful. Congratulations once again, Scott - I think the Essex police should have it as required reading (and judiciary!) and that the force should be investigated.

*****

Mr D.B. Just finished the Jeremy Bamber book- fantastic reading

*****

Mrs P. S. I have just finished reading your book Bamber. I must say I found it fascinating, I am a avid reader I look forward to reading your future publications

*****

Reviews of my Barry George books
'A must read ... fantastic', 'Very good', 'Great book', 'Fascinating', 'An extraordinarily competent piece of work', 'carefully researched ... meticulous', 'riveting reading'

For media reviews and comments please visit the 'What The Media Has Said' section of this website

Trashionista website (a ‘chick-lit’ site reviewing books: Justice for Jill isn't simply a history of the case, its author, Scott Lomax, also firmly believes that George is innocent and sets out the evidence fairly and in minute detail. It's a fascinating, compelling and deeply upsetting book.
It's not a sensationalist "true crime" style book and, as such, can get a bit dense, but it's not a book that you'd read for entertainment, obviously. If you're interested in the case, in law, in miscarriages of justice, it's a must-read. But expect to have your faith in the criminal justice system shaken.

*****

Graham Ball of the Express newspaper: 'I think the case you make for Barry George is compelling and an extraordinarily competent piece of work from someone of your age.'

*****

T. S. Ward (London) ‘If you care about justice then please buy this book, (18 Nov 2007) The author presents an intelligent and well paced treatise on the subject of Jill Dando's murder. Lomax is clearly an honourable person who values his role as an independent and unbiased observer of important events. If true justice is to prevail in our ever diminishing 'democracy' then we need to support those who invest time and effort in order to offset the imbalance that exists between what is fact and what is presented as being fact by those who clearly have a very nebulous interpretation as to what constitutes integrity.’

*****

Mr J. V. ‘I have just finished reading 'Justice for Jill', and would like to congratulate you on an extremely well researched book. One of the few books I have read in recent history and was reluctant to put down.’

*****

Mr T. A.: I enjoy reading UK True Crime...and select my books carefully - "Gangster Books" don't count. I am coming to the end of "Justice for Jill" ...and wanted to congratulate you on:
1. Your detail
2. Your logical book / argument construction
3. Your referencing.
I enjoy detail ...your level of detail is rarely seen. Again congratulations..and thanks

*****

Chesterfield and North East Derbyshire Liberty: 'Scott's book makes riveting reading. ... Scott has undertaken an incredible amount of research and presents thought-provoking arguments which suggest Barry George is innocent. Well worth reading.'

*****

M Kinnear from Scotland: 'What can be more worth while than a book written to save a life? Hopefully as more people read this compelling insight into a horrendous miscarriage of justice there will be a public outcry. This book is a MUST READ for anyone interested in our right to a fair and honest judicial system. I can't believe such a high profile case has been handled so badly and that (as this book proves) Jill Dando's murder has gone unpunished. Full marks to S.C Lomax for a fantastic book that is well written and (unlike the police investigation) leaves no stone unturned.'

*****

C M Macneil' from the USA: 'The case of the Crown vs. George has been compared to the American case of the People vs. (O.J.) Simpson, the ex-professional football player charged in the truly gruesome murders of his ex-wife and a man who had the fatal misfortunate of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. If there are any parallels in the two cases, they certainly end with their verdicts: whereas Simpson was acquitted, George wasn't. For the non-Brit unfamiliar with the case, author Scott Lomax poses some troubling - if not fearsome - possibilities that Barry George may be a wrongfully convicted man for more than a couple of reasons, chief among them a "threshold" criminal investigation fuelled by a public outcry for conviction, and a media that might have predisposed public opinion to a presumption of George's guilt. If the chance that a wrongfully convicted man remains imprisoned exists, its tragedy is compounded by another of Lomax' theories: that the victim, TV personality Jill Dando, might not even have been the intended victim and her killer presumably remains at large. Lomax risks much - professionally and personally - in this expose that doesn't pander to the public's presumption of guilt and instead takes a courageous stand to challenge it. If Lomax is correct that the elements of a "miscarriage of justice" converged to convict an innocent man, George's case is a shameful commentary on the investigative, court and jury systems, and it demands reversal. In an American courtroom, the evidence against George as Lomax dismantles it would - hopefully - constitute reasonable doubt, thereby requiring acquittal. There's plenty of reasonable doubt about George's guilt in Lomax' book, and his work deserves not only a read by those still enthralled by the Dando case but by the architects of a very, very possible unjustice to her convicted killer.'

*****

Mrs M.F., Wiltshire: 'Yes, your book is very good and long may you continue to write good books and best sellers in the future.'

*****

C.A.: 'I have read "The Case of Barry George" and just want to say thank you for a fascinating book. The case is very interesting and I believe after reading the book that Barry George must be innocent, it is very hard to fit the case to his personality. It does seem to be a miscarriage of justice.'

*****

L.A. Naylor, London: 'From a factual stance the book is solid and probably the best thing that could ever happen for Barry. I like the way the book is written - it's thorough and leaves the most cynical reader in very little doubt as to Barry's innocence. It brings to light all the discrepancies and really should help in gaining support for him.'

*****

Mr J.H.R., Texas, USA: 'Even though you were 19 years old when you wrote the book, I must say you did an excellent job writing it. Your research in Barry's case certainly revealed a "shocking miscarriage of justice."

 
 
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